Regional Conference On Geomorphology Athens 2019

Focal Theme : Geomorphology of Climatically and Tectonically sensitive areas

About

RCG_2019

The IAG’s Regional Conference will take place in Athens. Athens is the capital of Greece with a continuous history of 2,500 yrs. You can easily reach the city using the Athens International Airport, a modern and safe airport which was constructed before the Olympic Games of 2004. The harbor of Piraeus is located a few kilometers away from the city Center of Athens and is connected by ferries with the Greek islands where the conference field trips will take place.

Aims & Topics

Regional Conference on Geomorphology (IAG) are to meet the new challenges for geoscientists and especially geomorphologists to better understand the response of the Earth system, to approach with new techniques and methods, to make new assessments and predictions for the future, and to contribute to society’s adaptation and preparedness. The conference aims to promote interaction and networking with young geoscientists, while its field trips will provide an enticing introduction to the many varied landforms of coastal geomorphology.

Read more

 

The geomorphology of the landscape represents the dynamic between creative and destructive processes. The interaction of these processes forms, modifies, or destroys geomorphic features on the Earth’s surface. Landforms and landscape are the result of uplift and erosion, both of which are moderated by tectonic and climatic boundary conditions. Rivers, hillslopes, coastlines, and other geomorphic features respond to governing variables of force and fluxes of energy and material. Over long periods, features of the landscape may come into dynamic equilibrium with these inputs assuming that the driving variables are stable, with time lags in response to changes in controlling variables. This lag time (reaction time plus relaxation time) is generally a period of instability. The term instability indicates rapid morphological change, increased movement of sediment (erosion, mass wasting, deposition), shifts in vegetative cover or type, accelerated change in hydrologic processes (such as from snow to rain or glacial ice to snow), and/or rates of change that are in excess of what can be sustained in the long-term.

Over geologic time, tectonic forces through the time-integrated effects of surface and rock uplift/ subsidence, and crustal deformation produce earth relief. The resulting relief is significantly modified by erosion: a process that is strongly controlled by climate. The form and evolution of a landscape is therefore determined by several fundamental controls, including tectonics, erosion, climate, lithology, and pre-existing geomorphology. Physical systems respond to a disturbance by altering their morphology to accommodate the new driving forces. How a geomorphological system responds to change also depends on the presence of positive or negative feedback processes. A negative feedback process is one that tends to restore the system to its previous state when it is disturbed, while a positive feedback process tends to 

accelerate the disturbance. Hence, systems with negative feedback tend to be stable, while positive feedback systems are unstable.

The sensitivity of the Earth system is defined by the system specifications that describe its propensity for change and its ability to absorb any disturbing forces.

Evidences of global climate change/warming includes widespread increases in average air and ocean temperatures, accelerated melting of glaciers, rising sea level, extreme climatic events, hurricanes, flash floods and extreme droughts. Given the increasing certainty that climate change is occurring and is accelerating, we can no longer assume that climate conditions in the future will resemble those in the past.  Climate change represents a disturbance to the driving variables. Earth’s atmosphere and ocean systems both raise several questions regarding the potential impacts of such change on water resources, agriculture, and ecosystems, three issues with immense importance to society..

 

Read less

Regional Conference on Geomorphology (IAG) are to meet the new challenges for geoscientists and especially geomorphologists to better understand the response of the Earth system, to approach with new techniques and methods, to make new assessments and predictions for the future, and to contribute to society’s adaptation and preparedness. The conference aims to promote interaction and networking with young geoscientists, while its field trips will provide an enticing introduction to the many varied landforms of coastal geomorphology.

Read more

 

The geomorphology of the landscape represents the dynamic between creative and destructive processes. The interaction of these processes forms, modifies, or destroys geomorphic features on the Earth’s surface. Landforms and landscape are the result of uplift and erosion, both of which are moderated by tectonic and climatic boundary conditions. Rivers, hillslopes, coastlines, and other geomorphic features respond to governing variables of force and fluxes of energy and material. Over long periods, features of the landscape may come into dynamic equilibrium with these inputs assuming that the driving variables are stable, with time lags in response to changes in controlling variables. This lag time (reaction time plus relaxation time) is generally a period of instability. The term instability indicates rapid morphological change, increased movement of sediment (erosion, mass wasting, deposition), shifts in vegetative cover or type, accelerated change in hydrologic processes (such as from snow to rain or glacial ice to snow), and/or rates of change that are in excess of what can be sustained in the long-term.

Over geologic time, tectonic forces through the time-integrated effects of surface and rock uplift/ subsidence, and crustal deformation produce earth relief. The resulting relief is significantly modified by erosion: a process that is strongly controlled by climate. The form and evolution of a landscape is therefore determined by several fundamental controls, including tectonics, erosion, climate, lithology, and pre-existing geomorphology. Physical systems respond to a disturbance by altering their morphology to accommodate the new driving forces. How a geomorphological system responds to change also depends on the presence of positive or negative feedback processes. A negative feedback process is one that tends to restore the system to its previous state when it is disturbed, while a positive feedback process tends to 

accelerate the disturbance. Hence, systems with negative feedback tend to be stable, while positive feedback systems are unstable.

The sensitivity of the Earth system is defined by the system specifications that describe its propensity for change and its ability to absorb any disturbing forces.

Evidences of global climate change/warming includes widespread increases in average air and ocean temperatures, accelerated melting of glaciers, rising sea level, extreme climatic events, hurricanes, flash floods and extreme droughts. Given the increasing certainty that climate change is occurring and is accelerating, we can no longer assume that climate conditions in the future will resemble those in the past.  Climate change represents a disturbance to the driving variables. Earth’s atmosphere and ocean systems both raise several questions regarding the potential impacts of such change on water resources, agriculture, and ecosystems, three issues with immense importance to society..

 

Read less

Agenda

Sept 19th 2019

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

Sept 19th 2019 - Sept 20th 2019

Conference Center

Historical Building, 30 Panepistimiou Str., Athens, Greece

Sept 21th 2019

Auditorium of the Acropolis Museum

Sept 21th 2019 -

It has a capacity of 204 seats and is located on the ground floor of the Museum.

A guided tour to the museum will be included in the conference programme.

Important dates

First circularSep 1st 2018
Second circularOct 31th 2018
Call for abstractsOct 31th 2018
Abstract Submission will be closed onApr 30th 2019
Early Bird Registration will be closed on May 15th 2019
Regular Registration will be closed onJul 31th 2019
Late RegistrationFrom August 1st, 2019 onwards
Field Trip Participation FeeSep 1st 2018, updated every 4 – 6 months

Sept 15th 2019

Pre-Conference Field Trip, Mykonos & Delos Islands

Sept 15th 2019 - Sept 18th 2019

Sept 15th 2019

Pre-Conference Field Trip, Santorini Island

Sept 15th 2019 - Sept 18th 2019

Sept 19th 2019

IAG’s Regional Conference, Athens

Sept 19th 2019 - Sept 21th 2019

Sept 22th 2019

Post-Conference Field Trip, Rhodes Island, in the memory of Paolo Pirazzoli

Sept 22th 2019 - Sept 25th 2019

Sept 22th 2019

2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course: Field Training School

Sept 22th 2019 - Sept 27th 2019

Our Speakers

Prof Benjamin P. Horton

Asian School of the Environment, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, USA

Prof. Dr. Andreas Vött

Institute for Geography

Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

Taylor Perron

Associate Professor and Associate Department Head
Department of Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Sciences
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Scientific Sessions

The final themes of the scientific sessions of the conference, including the special sessions and the Chairpersons, will be announced with the second circular ( Oct 31th 2018 ) or earlier on the updated website of the conference.

Conveners:

Paul Carling (UK), K. Tsanakas (Greece), Ian Rutherfurd (Australia), He-Qing Huang (China)


A fundamental contribution of earth scientists is to make convincing predictions about river channel change that are useful to the public and to decision makers. This is particularly important in developing areas of the world, where human impact has not yet radically altered river morphologies, but where development pressures are mounting.  It is also critical in the face of climate change, and the probable increase in extreme events. Unnatural channel change contributes to degradation in aquatic habitats, extinction of riverine species, loss of flood-retaining areas etc. The purpose of this session is to communicate recent advances in theory and modelling of how river systems change at all scales and consequently, to identify complex self-organized models of river systems. We welcome studies conducted in a wide range of geographical areas, using a broad range of methodologies.

Please note that this session is organised by a working group of the International Association of Geomorphologists.

Conveners:

Andreas Vott (Germany), Stéphane Desruelles (France), Konstantinos Vouvalidis (Greece)


Conveners:

Giuseppe Mastronuzzi (Italy), Florin Pendea (Canada), Niki Evelpidou (Greece)


Conveners:

Achim A. Beylich, Zbigniew Zwolinski


Conveners:

Zbigniew Zwolinski (Poland), Marco Giardino (Italy)


Conveners:

Bianca Carvalho Vieira (Brasil), Helene Petschko (Germany), Takashi Oguchi (Japan), Mihai Micu (Romania)


Conveners:

Petru Urdea (Romania), Carlo Baroni (Italy), Leonidas Stamatopoulos (Greece)


Conveners:

Allan James (USA), Dan Balteanou (Romania),Anna Karkani (Greece)


Conveners:

Francisco Gutiérrez (Espania), Chris Pennos (Greece)


Conveners:

Taylor Perron (USA), William Ouimet (USA), Emmanuel Vassilakis (Greece)


Conveners:

Christian Gorini (France), Benjamin Medvedef (Israel), Spyros Bellas (Greece)


Conveners:

Alessandra Savini (Italy), Aaron Micallef (Malta), Paraskevi Nomikou (Greece)


Conveners:

Peter Van Der Beek (France), Giandomenico Fubelli (Italy), Efthimios Karymbalis (Greece)


Tectonic geomorphology focuses on understanding the mechanisms that drive interactions among Earth surface processes, tectonics and climate in landscape evolution, with implications for the forecasting of future scenarios.

The IAG Tectonic Geomorphology Working Group and the EGU Geomorphology Division co-organize this session to present and promote multi-disciplinary and innovative research aimed at defining the effects of active tectonics on landscapes.

Over the past decades, advances in the quantification of both the physical behavior and the rates of tectonic and surface processes have led to an explosion of new research in the field of Tectonic Geomorphology. Understanding the mechanisms that drive the interactions between Earth’s internal and surface processes, as well as their mutual feedback relationships, is a key topic for a wide scientific community. Modern Tectonic Geomorphology is an exceptionally integrative field that utilizes techniques and data derived from multidisciplinary approaches involving geomorphology, seismology, sedimentology, geochronology, structural and engineering geology, climatology and Quaternary geology.

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Given the recent development of new tools and methodologies (e.g., quantitative and object-based geomorphology, geodesy, improved chronological techniques, numerical modeling, quantitative stratigraphy), this session aims at presenting and promoting multidisciplinary and innovative studies in Tectonic Geomorphology in various geodynamic contexts.

Contributions focusing on distinctive space and time scales are welcome. Regional- to basin-scale studies deciphering the long-term geomorphological evolution related to mantle and deep crustal activity, as well as basin- to slope-scale research decoding short-term to catastrophic morpho-evolutionary contexts are strongly encouraged. Importance will also be given to advanced and original studies including: the mapping and use of geomorphic markers for tracing deformation; chronological techniques used to date geomorphic markers and events; development of geostatistical and geomorphic tools to detect active tectonic structures; calibration and integration of quantitative methods to estimate uplift, erosion and deposition rates; geodetic techniques for defining recent deformation; landscape evolution modeling; analysis of the effects of morpho-evolutionary rates on large slope instabilities; paleoseismologic approaches to calibrate past deformation.

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Field Trips

All the field trip destinations are to islands that in September are normally in high season. Although, there is no limit for the number of participants in the field trips, the participation fee depends on the accommodation cost and availability. So, an update on the fee every 4 – 6 months is required. Field trip registrations will close with the end of accommodation availability. Field Trip Registration opens onSeptember 1st 2018. Prior action for Field Trip Registration is the Conference Registration.

Pre-Conference Field Trips

Santorini Island, Cyclades, Aegean Sea

Duration: 4 Days – 3 Nights

Thira (Santorini) Island is located in the center of the Aegean Sea. The geomorphology of the island is highly related with the presence of an active volcano. The great volcanic eruption in the late Bronze Age (ca.1600 BC) destroyed the Cycladic Civilization and buried the ancient settlement of Akrotiri under 30 meters of volcanic ash. The participants will be introduced on the geomorphological and coastal evolution of the island and visit the Caldera, the active volcano and the archaeological site of Santorini.  

Conveners:Vouvalidis Konstantinosvouval@geo.auth.gr
Nomikou Paraskevievinom@geol.uoa.gr
Pavlides Spyridonpavlides@geo.auth.gr

Mykonos & Delos Islands, Cyclades, Aegean Sea.

Duration: 4 Days – 3 Nights

Mykonos and Delos Islands are located to the north part of Cyclades.The islands have a rich coastal archaeo-geomorphology with evidence of relative sea level changes along with archaeological sites.The participants will be introduced on the geomorphological and coastal evolution of the islands. 

Conveners:Kapsimalis Vasilioskapsim@hcmr.gr
Desruelles Stéphanestephane.desruelles@sorbonne-universite.fr

Post-Conference Field Trip

Rhodes Island, Aegean Sea. In the memory of Paolo Pirazzoli

Duration: 4 Days – 3 Nights

Rhodes Island is located in the southeast part of the Aegean Sea. The Island is rich in geomorphological sea level indicators, mainly in the form of uplifted tidal notches, which reveal that Rhodes is composed of small crustal blocks with each block being affected by a particular tectonic history. The participants will be introduced on the coastal geomorphological coastal evolution of the island, controlled by tectonics, and its paleo-seismicity history.

Conveners:Evelpidou Nikievelpidou@geol.uoa.gr
Kapsimalis Vasilioskapsim@hcmr.gr
Stiros Stathisstiros@upatras.gr
Karkani Annaekarkani@geol.uoa.gr
Christophe Morhangemorhange@cerege.fr

2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course

Field Training School on “Coastal Geomorphology of Climatically and Τectonically sensitive areas”

As part of the Conference programme, the “2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course” will be organized during 22-27 September 2019 at the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research faculties (Anavyssos, Attica) and Harokopio University of Athens. The event will be part of the IAG Training Programme, which encourages and promotes Early Career Geomorphologists worldwide by offering grants and bringing them to interact with renowned Geomorphologists and Geoscientists regarding their research activities. The event will be for the second time organized in collaboration with the EGU Geomorphology Division, based on a Memorandum of Understanding recently signed between the aforementioned and the IAG.The “2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course” will be an extraordinary occasion for Early Career Geomorphologists, and especially for those from less-favoured countries, to i) increase their knowledge and experience in geomorphological research; ii) discuss their learning and research experience with young colleagues from different countries; iii) meet experienced scientists and early career researchers in an informal setting, which favours scientific discussion. The Intensive Course will be focused on pioneering techniques, innovative and multidisciplinary approaches to be used in geomorphological field work in Climatically and Tectonically sensitive coastal areas. Greece is the ideal place to study the coastal geomorphological processes and the evolution of the coastal environments, given its coastline more than 16,000 km long and more than 200 inhabited islands.The “2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course” will take place as Field Training School in two sites of interest highly affected by climate change and active tectonics. These sites are the coastline of Attica and the Gulf of Corinth. The coastline of Attica has been inhabited since the prehistory and affected by Holocene sea level rise. In addition, the Gulf of Corinth is one of the world’s most active and studied rift basins. Active tectonics highly affected the geomorphology of the area uplifting marine terraces to an elevation of 600 m and submerging the inner part of the gulf.The Training School will be focused on specific techniques of Coastal Geomorphology like:

  • Coastal bathymetry and high resolution seismic profiles (using the boat of the HCMR)
  • LIDAR cloud data for emerged coasts
  • Vibracore drilling and core sample analysis
  • Geomorphological mapping of tectonic and marine terraces (Gulf of Corinth)
  • GIS and Remote sensing techniques for coastal zone mapping and geomorphometry

NameAffiliationE-mail
Efthimios Karymbalis Harokopio University,
Head of the Geography Department
karymbalis@hua.gr
Peter van der BeekUniversité Grenoble Alpes, France -
EGU GM President and Chair of the
IAG Working Group on Tectonic Geomorphology
peter.van-der-beek@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr
Kosmas PavlopoulosUniversité Paris Sorbonne Abu Dhabi
kosmas.pavlopoulos@psuad.ac.ae
Vasilios KapsimalisHellenic Centre for Marine Researchkapsim@hcmr.gr
Marta Della SetaSapienza University of Rome, Italymarta.dellaseta@uniroma1.it
Paola Fredi
Sapienza University of Rome, Italy – Chair of the IAG Working Group on Tectonic Geomorphologypaola.fredi@uniroma1.it
Anna Schoch
University of Bonn, Germany – Coordinator of the International Network of Young Geomorphologistsanna.schoch@uni-bonn.de

NameAffiliationE-mail
Sofia PechlivanidouUniversity of Bergen, Norway, Researchersofia.pechlivanidou@geo.uib.no
Dimitrios VandarakisHellenic Centre for Marine Research, Researcherdivandarakis@hcmr.gr
Ioannis SaitisNational & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Researchersaitij@geol.uoa.gr
Vassilios BatzakisHarokopio Universitympatzakis@hua.gr
Christina GallousiHarokopio Universitygallousi@hua.gr

REGISTRATION FORM

For the participation to the

2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course: Field Training School on
“Coastal Geomorphology of
Climatically and Τectonically sensitive areas”

Regional Conference on Geomorphology – RCG2019

Athens, Greece, 22 – 27 September 2019

Registration
300 words max

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION

  • Authors must pay the abstract fee at the time of submission of their abstract(s). Abstract submission will be INCOMPLETE without the payment of abstract fee.
  • Abstract fee once paid is NOT Refundable.

STUDENT REGISTRATION

Student Registration Fee is applied to the persons below 35 years of age and continuing their M.Sc./M.Phil./Ph. D. as a Full –time student/scholar. A copy of an ID document is required (Institutional ID card or a letter from the Departmental Head or Research Supervisor) to avail the student’s registration facility. Non-compliant delegates will be charged the applicable full registration rate.

ACCOMPANYING PERSON’S REGISTRATION INCLUDES

The accompanying person(s) rate is intended for spouses or other relatives of participants registered in any of the other categories. Accompanying person registered in this category cannot present papers or posters, however, they are allowed to attend conference sessions/meetings.

MODE OF PAYMENT OF REGISTRATION FEE

Registration Fee can be paid online through conference website.

REGISTRATION CANCELLATION & REFUND POLICY

In case of cancellation of registration, following terms & conditions for refund will apply:

  • Cancellation request must be received by the conference secretariat through email at secretariat@rcg2019.com
  • Refund, if any will be done post conference within 20 days of conclusion of RCG 2019.
  • 50% refund for cancellation request received on or before 31st July, 2019.
  • NO REFUND for cancellations received after 31st July, 2019.
  • NO REFUND for the fee paid for abstract submission.

Conference fees

All participants can apply for a discount on the conference fee, whenever their country (National Scientific Member) is financially-settled with the IAG’s annual fee. Relevant information will be available on the IAG website in due time.

Regular

Discount

Early Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€300

Regular Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€350

Late Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€400

Students, Honorary Fellows, Retired, National delegates

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€180

Accompanied Person

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€100

Early Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€250

Regular Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€300

Late Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€350

Students, Honorary Fellows, Retired, National delegates

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€180

Accompanied Person

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The gala dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€100

Organizers

The Greek Committee for Geomorphology & Environment of the Geological Association of Greece, IAG/AIG national member for Greece.

Co-Organizers

DesignationNameAffiliationE-mail
PresidentEvelpidou NikiUniversity of Athensevelpidou@geol.uoa.gr
Vice-President Albanakis KonstantinosAristotle University of Thessalonikialbanaki@geo.auth.gr
Vice-President Palvopoulos KosmasUniversité Paris Sorbonne Abu DhabiKosmas.Pavlopoulos
@psuad.ac.ae
General SecretaryVouvalidis KonstantinosAristotle University of Thessalonikivouval@geo.auth.gr
Assistant General SecretaryPoulos SerafimUniversity of Athenspoulos@geol.uoa.gr
Special SecretaryKapsimalis VasiliosHellenic Centre for Marine Researchkapsim@hcmr.gr
Assistant Special SecretarySakellariou DimitrisHellenic Centre for Marine Researchsakell@hcmr.gr
TreasurerStamatopoulos LeonidasUniversity of Patrasleonstan@upatras.gr
Assistant TreasurerVassilakis Emmanuel University of Athensevasilak@geol.uoa.gr
MembersKarymbalis Efthimios Harokopio Universitykarymbalis@hua.gr
Papatheodorou George University of Patrasgpapathe@upatras.gr
Gournelos Theodoros University of Athensgournelos@geol.uoa.gr
Pavlides Spyridon University of Thessalonikipavlides@geo.auth.gr
Nomikou ParaskeviUniversity of Athensevinom@geol.uoa.gr
Desruelles StéphaneSorbonne University stephane.desruelles@sorbonne-universite.fr

NameAffiliationCountryE-mail
BALTEANU, Dan Institute of GeographyRomaniaigar@geoinst.ro
CAPOLONGO, DomenicoUniversity of BariItalycapolongo.domenico
@gmail.com
CARLING, PaulUniversity of SouthamptonGreat BritainP.A.Carling@soton.ac.uk
CARVALHO VIEIRA, Bianca University of Sao PaoloBrazilbiancacv@usp.br
CONWAY, Susan University of NantesGreat Britainsusan.conway@univ-nantes.fr
CORATZA, Paola University of Modena & Reggio EmiliaItalypaola.coratza@unimore.it
DELLA SETA, Marta Sapienza University of RomeItalymarta.dellaseta@uniroma1.it
FERENTINOS, GeorgeUniversity of PatrasGreecegferen@upatras.gr
FORT, Monique University of Paris DiderotFrancefort.monique@gmail.com
FOUACHE, Eric Paris-Sorbonne University Abu DhabiFranceEric.Fouache@psuad.ac.ae
FREDI, Paola Sapienza University of RomeItalypaola.fredi@uniroma1.it
HUANG, He QingIGSNRR, Chinese Academy of SciencesPRChuanghq@igsnrr.ac.cn
KUMAR DE, Sunil North Eastern Hill UniversityIndiadesunil@yahoo.com
LUPIA PALMIERI, Elvidio Sapienza University of RomeItalyelvidio.lupiapalmieri
@uniroma1.it
MAO, LucaCatholic University of ChileChilelmao@uc.cl
MASTRONUZZI, Giuseppe University of BariItalygimastronuzzi@libero.it
MEADOWS, Mike University of Cape TownSouth Africamichael.meadows@uct.ac.za
MICALLEF, Aaron University of MaltaMaltaaaron.micallef@um.edu.mt
MICU, Mihai Institute of GeographyRomaniamikkutu@yahoo.com
MORHANGE, ChristopheCEREGEFrancemorhange@cerege.fr
OGUCHI, TakashiUniversity of TokyoJapanoguchi@csis.u-tokyo.ac.jp
OUIMET, WilliamUniversity of ConnecticutUSAwilliam.ouimet@uconn.edu
PENDEA, Florin Lakehead UniversityCanadaifpendea@lakeheadu.ca
PERRON, Taylor Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyUSAperron@mit.edu
SCHIATTARELLA, Marcello University of PotenzaItalymarcello.schiattarella
@unibas.it
SEPEHR, Adel University of MashhadIranadelsepehr@aol.com
SIVAN, DoritUniversity of HaifaIsraeldsivan@research.haifa.ac.il
SOLDATI, Mauro University of Modena & Reggio EmiliaItalysoldati@unimore.it
URDEA, PetruUniversity of TimisoaraRomaniapetru.urdea@e-uvt.ro
VÖTT, Andreas University of MainzGermanyA.Voett@geo.uni-mainz.de
ZANGMO TEFOGOUM, Ghislain University of MarouaCameroonzangmotefogoum@gmail.com
ZOUROS, NickolasUniversity of the AegeanGreecenzour@aegean.gr
MATHER, AnneUniversity of PlymouthGreat BritainA.Mather@plymouth.ac.uk
GILES, PhilipSaint Mary’s UniversityCanadaphilip.giles@smu.ca
MAROUKIAN, HampikUniversity of Athens Greecemaroukian@geol.uoa.gr
GAKI, KalliopiUniversity of Athens Greecegaki@geol.uoa.gr
GUTIERREZ, FranciscoUniversity of ZaragozaSpainfgutier@unizar.es
PANIZZA, MarioUniversity of Modena and Reggio EmiliaItalymario.panizza@unimore.it
MIGOŃ, PiotrUniversity of WrocławPolandpiotr.migon@uwr.edu.pl

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