Regional Conference On Geomorphology Athens 2019

Focal Theme : Geomorphology of Climatically and Tectonically Sensitive Areas

About

RCG_2019

The IAG’s Regional Conference will take place in Athens. Athens is the capital of Greece with a continuous history of 2,500 yrs. You can easily reach the city using the Athens International Airport, a modern and safe airport which was constructed before the Olympic Games of 2004. The harbor of Piraeus is located a few kilometers away from the city Center of Athens and is connected by ferries with the Greek islands where the conference field trips will take place.

Aims & Topics

Regional Conference on Geomorphology (IAG) are to meet the new challenges for geoscientists and especially geomorphologists to better understand the response of the Earth system, to approach with new techniques and methods, to make new assessments and predictions for the future, and to contribute to society’s adaptation and preparedness. The conference aims to promote interaction and networking with young geoscientists, while its field trips will provide an enticing introduction to the many varied landforms of coastal geomorphology.

Read more

 

The geomorphology of the landscape represents the dynamic between creative and destructive processes. The interaction of these processes forms, modifies, or destroys geomorphic features on the Earth’s surface. Landforms and landscape are the result of uplift and erosion, both of which are moderated by tectonic and climatic boundary conditions. Rivers, hillslopes, coastlines, and other geomorphic features respond to governing variables of force and fluxes of energy and material. Over long periods, features of the landscape may come into dynamic equilibrium with these inputs assuming that the driving variables are stable, with time lags in response to changes in controlling variables. This lag time (reaction time plus relaxation time) is generally a period of instability. The term instability indicates rapid morphological change, increased movement of sediment (erosion, mass wasting, deposition), shifts in vegetative cover or type, accelerated change in hydrologic processes (such as from snow to rain or glacial ice to snow), and/or rates of change that are in excess of what can be sustained in the long-term.

Over geologic time, tectonic forces through the time-integrated effects of surface and rock uplift/ subsidence, and crustal deformation produce earth relief. The resulting relief is significantly modified by erosion: a process that is strongly controlled by climate. The form and evolution of a landscape is therefore determined by several fundamental controls, including tectonics, erosion, climate, lithology, and pre-existing geomorphology. Physical systems respond to a disturbance by altering their morphology to accommodate the new driving forces. How a geomorphological system responds to change also depends on the presence of positive or negative feedback processes. A negative feedback process is one that tends to restore the system to its previous state when it is disturbed, while a positive feedback process tends to accelerate the disturbance. Hence, systems with negative feedback tend to be stable, while positive feedback systems are unstable.

The sensitivity of the Earth system is defined by the system specifications that describe its propensity for change and its ability to absorb any disturbing forces.

Evidences of global climate change/warming includes widespread increases in average air and ocean temperatures, accelerated melting of glaciers, rising sea level, extreme climatic events, hurricanes, flash floods and extreme droughts. Given the increasing certainty that climate change is occurring and is accelerating, we can no longer assume that climate conditions in the future will resemble those in the past.  Climate change represents a disturbance to the driving variables. Earth’s atmosphere and ocean systems both raise several questions regarding the potential impacts of such change on water resources, agriculture, and ecosystems, three issues with immense importance to society..

 

Read less

Regional Conference on Geomorphology (IAG) are to meet the new challenges for geoscientists and especially geomorphologists to better understand the response of the Earth system, to approach with new techniques and methods, to make new assessments and predictions for the future, and to contribute to society’s adaptation and preparedness. The conference aims to promote interaction and networking with young geoscientists, while its field trips will provide an enticing introduction to the many varied landforms of coastal geomorphology.

Read more

 

The geomorphology of the landscape represents the dynamic between creative and destructive processes. The interaction of these processes forms, modifies, or destroys geomorphic features on the Earth’s surface. Landforms and landscape are the result of uplift and erosion, both of which are moderated by tectonic and climatic boundary conditions. Rivers, hillslopes, coastlines, and other geomorphic features respond to governing variables of force and fluxes of energy and material. Over long periods, features of the landscape may come into dynamic equilibrium with these inputs assuming that the driving variables are stable, with time lags in response to changes in controlling variables. This lag time (reaction time plus relaxation time) is generally a period of instability. The term instability indicates rapid morphological change, increased movement of sediment (erosion, mass wasting, deposition), shifts in vegetative cover or type, accelerated change in hydrologic processes (such as from snow to rain or glacial ice to snow), and/or rates of change that are in excess of what can be sustained in the long-term.

Over geologic time, tectonic forces through the time-integrated effects of surface and rock uplift/ subsidence, and crustal deformation produce earth relief. The resulting relief is significantly modified by erosion: a process that is strongly controlled by climate. The form and evolution of a landscape is therefore determined by several fundamental controls, including tectonics, erosion, climate, lithology, and pre-existing geomorphology. Physical systems respond to a disturbance by altering their morphology to accommodate the new driving forces. How a geomorphological system responds to change also depends on the presence of positive or negative feedback processes. A negative feedback process is one that tends to restore the system to its previous state when it is disturbed, while a positive feedback process tends to accelerate the disturbance. Hence, systems with negative feedback tend to be stable, while positive feedback systems are unstable.

The sensitivity of the Earth system is defined by the system specifications that describe its propensity for change and its ability to absorb any disturbing forces.

Evidences of global climate change/warming includes widespread increases in average air and ocean temperatures, accelerated melting of glaciers, rising sea level, extreme climatic events, hurricanes, flash floods and extreme droughts. Given the increasing certainty that climate change is occurring and is accelerating, we can no longer assume that climate conditions in the future will resemble those in the past.  Climate change represents a disturbance to the driving variables. Earth’s atmosphere and ocean systems both raise several questions regarding the potential impacts of such change on water resources, agriculture, and ecosystems, three issues with immense importance to society..

 

Read less

Agenda

Sept 19th 2019

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

Sept 19th 2019 - Sept 21th 2019

Conference Center

Historical Building, 30 Panepistimiou Str., Athens, Greece

Important dates

First circularSep 1st 2018
Call for abstractsOPEN
Abstract Submission will be closed onMay 15th 2019

extended to May 31st 2019

Early Bird Registration will be closed on May 20th 2019

extended to June 15th 2019

Regular Registration will be closed onAug 15th 2019
Late RegistrationFrom August 16th, 2019 onwards
Field Trip ParticipationOPEN

Sept 15th 2019

Pre-Conference Field Trip, Mykonos & Delos Islands

Sept 15th 2019 - Sept 18th 2019

Sept 15th 2019

Pre-Conference Field Trip, Santorini Island

Sept 15th 2019 - Sept 18th 2019

Sept 19th 2019

IAG’s Regional Conference, Athens

Sept 19th 2019 - Sept 21th 2019

Sept 19th 2019

IAG’s Council Meeting

Sept 19th 2019 - at 6:00 P.M.

Sept 20th 2019

Gala Dinner of the Conference

Sept 20th 2019 -

Sept 22th 2019

Post-Conference Field Trip, Rhodes Island, in the memory of Paolo Pirazzoli

Sept 22th 2019 - Sept 25th 2019

Sept 22th 2019

2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course: Field Training School

Sept 22th 2019 - Sept 27th 2019

Our Speakers

Andreas Vött

Institute for Geography
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

Taylor Perron

Associate Professor and Associate Department Head
Department of Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Sciences
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Emmanuel Reynard

Institute of Geography and Sustainability
University of Lausanne

Piotr MIGOŃ

Department of Geography and Regional Development
University of Wrocław

Our Speakers

Andreas Vött

Institute for Geography
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

Taylor Perron

Associate Professor and Associate Department Head
Department of Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Sciences
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Emmanuel Reynard

Institute of Geography and Sustainability
University of Lausanne

Piotr MIGOŃ

Department of Geography and Regional Development
University of Wrocław

Scientific Sessions

Conveners:

Paul Carling (UK), Konstantinos Tsanakas (Greece), Ian Rutherfurd (Australia), He-Qing Huang (China)


A fundamental contribution of earth scientists is to make convincing predictions about river channel change that are useful to the public and to decision makers. This is particularly important in developing areas of the world, where human impact has not yet radically altered river morphologies, but where development pressures are mounting.  It is also critical in the face of climate change, and the probable increase in extreme events. Unnatural channel change contributes to degradation in aquatic habitats, extinction of riverine species, loss of flood-retaining areas etc. The purpose of this session is to communicate recent advances in theory and modelling of how river systems change at all scales and consequently, to identify complex self-organized models of river systems. We welcome studies conducted in a wide range of geographical areas, using a broad range of methodologies.

Please note that this session is organised by a working group of the International Association of Geomorphologists.

Conveners:

Andreas Vott (Germany), Matthieu Ghilardi (France), Konstantinos Vouvalidis (Greece)


Anthropocene is an epoch that highlights the increasing impact of humans on the earth and its environment. This impact is continuously increasing from the first human habitation in small communities to the point of human dominance over the ‘natural’ processes. A multi-disciplinary approach for the study of human impact on the Earth’s evolution and its ecosystems is more than necessary. Geoarchaeology is a set of methods and techniques from geomorphology and geosciences to reconstruct the paleo environments and landscape dynamics, in relation to human societies in an archaeological perspective. A regressive, diachronic and interdisciplinary approach that combines the surface and underground investigations methods with the multi proxy laboratory analysis and modeling.

This session invites scientific contributions aiming to bring together and discuss all the modern multi-disciplinary methods on Geoarchaeological research.

Conveners:

Giuseppe Mastronuzzi (Italy), Florin Pendea (Canada), Niki Evelpidou (Greece)


Coastal regions are amongst the most dynamic parts of the Earth’s surface. The coasts are affected and shaped by the tides, the currents, the wave regime, climatic changes and sea level fluctuations. Coastal areas are one of the most rapidly evolving systems on the planet. At the same time, the coasts are the most important areas used and inhabited by humans.

Due to climate change, the continuous sea level rise, and human interventions the coastal zone calls for the study of these sensitive coastal areas geared toward addressing future coastal zone protections strategies and for assessing the future impact. The climatically and tectonically sensitive coastal areas of the Mediterranean region require an expansion of our knowledge on the past and contemporary coastal changes and morphodynamics in order to better assess the impact of climate change and sea level rise in the future.

This session invites scientific contributions focusing on multi-disciplinary and innovative research on coastal geomorphological mapping techniques and methods, paleogeography & palaeoenvironment, sea level changes, and evolution of coastal landscape.

Conveners:

Achim A. Beylich (Norway), Zbigniew Zwolinski (Poland)


Climate change, human activities and other perturbations like, e.g., fires and earthquakes are likely to influence existing patterns of weathering, erosion, transport and deposition of mineral and organic materials (e.g., sediments, solutes, carbon, wood) across defined landscape components and units. The climatically and tectonically sensitive areas of the Mediterranean zone are expected to react particularly sensitive to ongoing and accelerated environmental changes. Our current knowledge on ancient and modern solute and sediment dynamics, and on the sediment cascade within Holocene to contemporary climates forms the basis for predicting the consequences of ongoing and future climate changes. However, much of our information is still limited in terms of spatial and temporal coverage and needs to be extended and consolidated. Denudation includes both chemical and mechanical processes and its spatiotemporal variability is controlled by a wide range of environmental drivers.

Read more

Only after coordinated research efforts and integration of regional datasets it is advisable to apply and test, with an acceptable degree of reliability, models of landscape response to climate change, anthropogenic impacts and other perturbations. This session invites scientific contributions on drivers and quantitative rates of denudational processes, soil erosion, connectivity and sedimentary budgets from small headwaters to large drainage basin systems, and from long-term to contemporary timescales. Studies with new results on denudation in the Mediterranean zone are welcome. The session shall bring together and discuss a wide range of advanced techniques and methods of data collection and generation, e.g., from field-based mapping, monitoring, fingerprinting and dating techniques to remotely sensed techniques, together with various approaches and methods of data analysis and geomorphological modelling, including extreme phenomena.

The session is organized by the I.A.G./A.I.G. Working Group on Denudation and Environmental Changes in Different Morphoclimatic Zones (DENUCHANGE).

Read less

Conveners:

Zbigniew Zwolinski (Poland), Marco Giardino (Italy)


The Mediterranean Basin is characterized by a very specific climate that influences the development of the landforms around it. However, climate change in recent decades has caused major repercussions on the secular development of the Mediterranean landforms. If we include geological conditions for the development of landforms, i.e. lithology, tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, and other extreme phenomena, then in the Mediterranean areas we have an extremely rich set of landform types, rarely found in other regions of the world. To this is added a centuries-old cultural and economic heritage, especially agricultural heritage, which also contributes in the geomorphological time-scale to changes in the landforms in this zone. So, what is the geodiversity status of the landforms in the Mediterranean regions? What is the heritage of geodiversity of the landforms? How does this landform change? What are the trends of landform changes? Which from geological, morphogenetic, hydrological or climatic conditions is crucial for the assessment of the geodiversity of the Mediterranean zone?

Read more

These are the questions which we should find answers during this session.

This session invites scientific contributions on excellent examples of geodiversity of the northern and southern terrestrial parts of the Mediterranean Sea. The session shall bring together and discuss a wide range of matter, methods and examples of Mediterranean geodiversity. We also invite you to present examples of geodiversity of landforms not only from the Mediterranean area, but also from other areas of the world with similar conditions for the development of landforms.

The session is organized by the IAG/AIG Working Group on Landforms Assessment for Geodiversity.

Read less

Conveners:

Bianca Carvalho Vieira (Brasil), Helene Petschko (Germany), Takashi Oguchi (Japan), Mihai Micu (Romania)
In collaboration with IGU


Geomorphic hazards are increasing in many regions, causing economic losses, damage, loss of human life and big changes in the landscape forms and in its dynamics. These processes occur in complex environments at global, regional and local scales and, because of this, it is important to find and apply innovative scientific approaches and new types of data collection to improve our knowledge on triggering factors and process mechanisms of natural hazards.

This session invites submissions focusing on research, empirical studies, and observations which present innovative research and case studies based on the interaction between the complex morphological processes (pluvial, fluvial, gravitational, hydrogeomorphological, pedological, including earthquakes and volcanic processes). We expect to discuss how these studies can be a contribution to properly estimate susceptibility, vulnerability and risk to forward natural hazard research and the reduction of negative effects on the society.

Read more

This session aims to gather contributions from the following research fields:

  1.  The latest scientific advancements in Geomorphology, including new techniques and methods: numerical, statistical and machine learning models, geochronological methods, UAV survey, digital elevation models, GIS resources and geomorphic mapping
  2. Improvement of approaches, at different scales, for natural hazards inventory, geomorphic hazard and risk analysis.
  3. The importance of geomorphic hazards studies for risk mitigation and reduction of societal effects and increase of human communities’ resilience;

Read less

Conveners:

Petru Urdea (Romania), Carlo Baroni (Italy), Leonidas Stamatopoulos (Greece)


For a huge area of the Northern Hemisphere the geomorphological landscape is connected to the quaternary  glaciation morphogenesis, prolonged in our days in the high mountains, followed and complemented in time by periglacial morphogenesis. Paleogeographic reconstructions, setting the chronological landmarks of past glaciations, are still challenging targets of contemporary geomorphology. In close relations with geoecological conditions, very different in space, like altitude, slope angle, exposition, lithology, vegetation cover, topoclimatical conditions etc., the permafrost and periglacial processes are very sensitive on the climate change. In this context, knowing the real interest of several geomorphologists to the specific problems of the glacial and periglacial landforms and processes, the aim of the proposed session is bringing together these experts and, on this occasion, finding the latest results of the study concerning this scientific field. On the other hand, is a good occasion to known the latest methods and techniques used in these kind of researches and, also, a good opportunity for new interdisciplinary approaches and possible working groups.

Read more

The papers will be grouped into a few major themes that:

  • Glaciated landscape mapping and chronology
  • Monitoring of the permafrost and the periglacial processes;
  • Mountain permafrost and climate changes;
  • Periglacial processes and geomorphological hazards;
  • GIS and geomorphological processes in the mountain areas;
  • Interdisciplinarity in the reconstruction of the paleogeomorphological landscape and paleoclimatology;

Read less

Conveners:

Paul Carling (UK), Konstantinos Tsanakas (Greece), Ian Rutherfurd (Australia), He-Qing Huang (China)


A fundamental contribution of earth scientists is to make convincing predictions about river channel change that are useful to the public and to decision makers. This is particularly important in developing areas of the world, where human impact has not yet radically altered river morphologies, but where development pressures are mounting.

Read more

It is also critical in the face of climate change, and the probable increase in extreme events. Unnatural channel change contributes to degradation in aquatic habitats, extinction of riverine species, loss of flood-retaining areas etc. The purpose of this session is to communicate recent advances in theory and modelling of how river systems change at all scales and consequently, to identify complex self-organized models of river systems. We welcome studies conducted in a wide range of geographical areas, using a broad range of methodologies.

Please note that this session is organised by a working group of the International Association of Geomorphologists.

Read less

Conveners:

Andreas Vott (Germany), Matthieu Ghilardi (France), Konstantinos Vouvalidis (Greece)


Anthropocene is an epoch that highlights the increasing impact of humans on the earth and its environment. This impact is continuously increasing from the first human habitation in small communities to the point of human dominance over the ‘natural’ processes. A multi-disciplinary approach for the study of human impact on the Earth’s evolution and its ecosystems is more than necessary. Geoarchaeology is a set of methods and techniques from geomorphology and geosciences to reconstruct the paleo environments and landscape dynamics, in relation to human societies in an archaeological perspective. A regressive, diachronic and interdisciplinary approach that combines the surface and underground investigations methods with the multi proxy laboratory analysis and modeling.

This session invites scientific contributions aiming to bring together and discuss all the modern multi-disciplinary methods on Geoarchaeological research.

Conveners:

Giuseppe Mastronuzzi (Italy), Florin Pendea (Canada), Niki Evelpidou (Greece)


Coastal regions are amongst the most dynamic parts of the Earth’s surface. The coasts are affected and shaped by the tides, the currents, the wave regime, climatic changes and sea level fluctuations. Coastal areas are one of the most rapidly evolving systems on the planet. At the same time, the coasts are the most important areas used and inhabited by humans.

Read more

Due to climate change, the continuous sea level rise, and human interventions the coastal zone calls for the study of these sensitive coastal areas geared toward addressing future coastal zone protections strategies and for assessing the future impact. The climatically and tectonically sensitive coastal areas of the Mediterranean region require an expansion of our knowledge on the past and contemporary coastal changes and morphodynamics in order to better assess the impact of climate change and sea level rise in the future.

This session invites scientific contributions focusing on multi-disciplinary and innovative research on coastal geomorphological mapping techniques and methods, paleogeography & palaeoenvironment, sea level changes, and evolution of coastal landscape.

Read less

Conveners:

Achim A. Beylich (Norway), Zbigniew Zwolinski (Poland)


Climate change, human activities and other perturbations like, e.g., fires and earthquakes are likely to influence existing patterns of weathering, erosion, transport and deposition of mineral and organic materials (e.g., sediments, solutes, carbon, wood) across defined landscape components and units. The climatically and tectonically sensitive areas of the Mediterranean zone are expected to react particularly sensitive to ongoing and accelerated environmental changes.

Read more

Our current knowledge on ancient and modern solute and sediment dynamics, and on the sediment cascade within Holocene to contemporary climates forms the basis for predicting the consequences of ongoing and future climate changes. However, much of our information is still limited in terms of spatial and temporal coverage and needs to be extended and consolidated. Denudation includes both chemical and mechanical processes and its spatiotemporal variability is controlled by a wide range of environmental drivers.

Only after coordinated research efforts and integration of regional datasets it is advisable to apply and test, with an acceptable degree of reliability, models of landscape response to climate change, anthropogenic impacts and other perturbations. This session invites scientific contributions on drivers and quantitative rates of denudational processes, soil erosion, connectivity and sedimentary budgets from small headwaters to large drainage basin systems, and from long-term to contemporary timescales. Studies with new results on denudation in the Mediterranean zone are welcome. The session shall bring together and discuss a wide range of advanced techniques and methods of data collection and generation, e.g., from field-based mapping, monitoring, fingerprinting and dating techniques to remotely sensed techniques, together with various approaches and methods of data analysis and geomorphological modelling, including extreme phenomena.

The session is organized by the I.A.G./A.I.G. Working Group on Denudation and Environmental Changes in Different Morphoclimatic Zones (DENUCHANGE).

Read less

Conveners:

Zbigniew Zwolinski (Poland), Marco Giardino (Italy)


The Mediterranean Basin is characterized by a very specific climate that influences the development of the landforms around it. However, climate change in recent decades has caused major repercussions on the secular development of the Mediterranean landforms. If we include geological conditions for the development of landforms, i.e. lithology, tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, and other extreme phenomena, then in the

Read more

Mediterranean areas we have an extremely rich set of landform types, rarely found in other regions of the world. To this is added a centuries-old cultural and economic heritage, especially agricultural heritage, which also contributes in the geomorphological time-scale to changes in the landforms in this zone. So, what is the geodiversity status of the landforms in the Mediterranean regions? What is the heritage of geodiversity of the landforms? How does this landform change? What are the trends of landform changes? Which from geological, morphogenetic, hydrological or climatic conditions is crucial for the assessment of the geodiversity of the Mediterranean zone?

These are the questions which we should find answers during this session.

This session invites scientific contributions on excellent examples of geodiversity of the northern and southern terrestrial parts of the Mediterranean Sea. The session shall bring together and discuss a wide range of matter, methods and examples of Mediterranean geodiversity. We also invite you to present examples of geodiversity of landforms not only from the Mediterranean area, but also from other areas of the world with similar conditions for the development of landforms.

The session is organized by the IAG/AIG Working Group on Landforms Assessment for Geodiversity.

Read less

Conveners:

Bianca Carvalho Vieira (Brasil), Helene Petschko (Germany), Takashi Oguchi (Japan), Mihai Micu (Romania)
In collaboration with IGU


Geomorphic hazards are increasing in many regions, causing economic losses, damage, loss of human life and big changes in the landscape forms and in its dynamics. These processes occur in complex environments at global, regional and local scales and, because of this, it is important to find and apply innovative scientific approaches and new types of data collection to improve our knowledge on triggering factors and process mechanisms of natural hazards.

Read more

This session invites submissions focusing on research, empirical studies, and observations which present innovative research and case studies based on the interaction between the complex morphological processes (pluvial, fluvial, gravitational, hydrogeomorphological, pedological, including earthquakes and volcanic processes). We expect to discuss how these studies can be a contribution to properly estimate

susceptibility, vulnerability and risk to forward natural hazard research and the reduction of negative effects on the society.

This session aims to gather contributions from the following research fields:

  1.  The latest scientific advancements in Geomorphology, including new techniques and methods: numerical, statistical and machine learning models, geochronological methods, UAV survey, digital elevation models, GIS resources and geomorphic mapping
  2. Improvement of approaches, at different scales, for natural hazards inventory, geomorphic hazard and risk analysis.
  3. The importance of geomorphic hazards studies for risk mitigation and reduction of societal effects and increase of human communities’ resilience;

Read less

Conveners:

Petru Urdea (Romania), Carlo Baroni (Italy), Leonidas Stamatopoulos (Greece)


For a huge area of the Northern Hemisphere the geomorphological landscape is connected to the quaternary  glaciation morphogenesis, prolonged in our days in the high mountains, followed and complemented in time by periglacial morphogenesis. Paleogeographic reconstructions, setting the chronological landmarks of past glaciations, are still challenging targets of contemporary geomorphology. In close relations with geoecological conditions, very different in space, like altitude, slope angle, exposition, lithology, vegetation cover, topoclimatical conditions etc., the permafrost and periglacial processes are very sensitive on the climate change. In this context, knowing the real interest of several geomorphologists to the specific problems of the glacial and periglacial landforms and processes, the aim of the proposed session is bringing together these experts and, on this occasion, finding the latest results of the study concerning this scientific field. On the other hand, is a good occasion to known the latest methods and techniques used in these kind of researches and, also, a good opportunity for new interdisciplinary approaches and possible working groups.

Read more

The papers will be grouped into a few major themes that:

  • Glaciated landscape mapping and chronology
  • Monitoring of the permafrost and the periglacial processes;
  • Mountain permafrost and climate changes;
  • Periglacial processes and geomorphological hazards;
  • GIS and geomorphological processes in the mountain areas;
  • Interdisciplinarity in the reconstruction of the paleogeomorphological landscape and paleoclimatology;

Read less

Conveners:

Allan James (USA), Dan Balteanu (Romania),Anna Karkani (Greece)


This session concentrates upon anthropogeomorphology; that is, the impacts of human activities on geomorphic systems. These impacts have varied through time from erosion and sedimentation generated by subtle, localized land-use changes in the Neolithic to large features, such as canals and mine pits that were generated relatively rapidly. The geomorphic systems of concern include direct impacts on fluvial, coastal, aeolian, and hillslope areas as well as indirect geomorphic impacts on cryogenic (periglacial and glacial), hydrofluvial, and coastal systems effected by climate warming, sea level rise, and associated processes. In this session we welcome contributions that emphasize geomorphic changes caused by humans from a scientific perspective, rather than impacts of geomorphic systems on humans. Although human adjustments to these changes, in the form of policies or adaptive behaviors, are relevant and may be included as important aspects of the geomorphic impacts, in this session we welcome papers focused on the physical nature of the changes at any spatial or temporal scale and the associated processes.

Conveners:

Francisco Gutiérrez (Espania), Chris Pennos (Greece), Aurel Persoiu (Romania)


Karst landforms are mainly the result of geochemical and hydrogeological processes acting on soluble substratum, either carbonates or evaporites. The resulting landscapes are widespread around the globe, covering around 20%of the ice-free land surface, and including numerous properties of outstanding universal value. Understanding the peculiar geomorphology and hydrology of these environments is essential to prevent and mitigate a great deal of environmental and engineering problems associated with them (e.g., sinkholes, water over-exploitation and degradation). Moreover, karst caves contain some of the most valuable paleoenvironmental records of the continental realm. This session aims to bring together researchers working on karst geomorphology and related topics.

Special attention will be given to the following themes: (1) driving agents and scales of karst dissolution; (2) impact of active tectonics on cave architecture; (3) karst deposits and their paleoclimate record; (4) karst in high-solubility evaporite rocks; (5) impact and hazards in karst environments; (6) paleokarst.

Conveners:

Taylor Perron (USA), William Ouimet (USA), Emmanuel Vassilakis (Greece)


In recent decades, research in geomorphology has increasingly used high resolution topography from sources such as LiDAR (aerial or ground based), Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry (SfM), and even handheld scanning devices. Analysis techniques have expanded to include point cloud processing and change detection by differencing in addition to methods based on high-resolution DEMs. Beyond geomorphology, these datasets offer a new perspective in other disciplines through high-resolution geological or landform mapping, measurement of active environmental processes, or monitoring various  natural hazards.

We invite contributions describing research that leverages high-resolution topography and terrain analysis at any scale and in any environment, including field studies, theoretical studies, and descriptions of new methodologies, best practices, advantages or limitations in the use of such datasets.

Conveners:

Christian Gorini (France), Benjamin Medvedef (Israel), Spyros Bellas (Greece)


We now know that both deep-seated as well as surficial geological processes control geomorphological evolution of landscapes and seascapes. Increasingly higher resolution 2D and 3D seismic surveys, in combination with the continuously improving visualization tools, help us better understand the vertical architecture of landforms.

Although sequence stratigraphic concepts are being applied at increasing higher orders, even at the scale of Milankovitch cyclicity in high-sedimentation rate successions, it is also becoming apparent that regional tectonics (in addition to climate and eustasy) play an important role, i.e., dissimilar tectonic regimes can appreciably modify the resulting depositional architecture and passive margin models often cannot be applied in tectonically active areas.  Geomorphological panoramas gleaned through high-resolution seismics, especially 3D, can now allow us to understand and exploit deep-water depositional environments.

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In this session we hope to cover the state of the art of both clastic and carbonate depositional systems in shallow and deep water environments, their differences, and role played by both deep-seated and surficial processes.

Read less

Conveners:

Alessandra Savini (Italy), Aaron Micallef (Malta), Paraskevi Nomikou (Greece)


The shape of the seafloor and sub-seafloor stratigraphic horizons preserve a wealth of information that reflects the time-integrated effects of tectonic, sedimentary, oceanographic and volcanic processes. Many such processes are hazards to coastal populations and offshore installations, and they constitute key objectives of national research programmes and IODP expeditions, notably in climatically and tectonically sensitive regions. High quality bathymetry, especially when combined with sub-seafloor and/or seabed measurements, provides an exciting opportunity to integrate the approaches of geomorphology and geophysics and to extend quantitative geomorphology offshore.

This session aims to examine the causes and consequences of geomorphic and tectonic processes shaping underwater landscapes, including submarine erosion and depositional processes, submarine landslides, sediment transfer and deformation, volcanic activity, fluid migration and escape, faulting and folding. 

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The general goal of the session is to bring together researchers who characterise the shape of past and present seafloor features, seek to understand the sub-surface and surface processes at work and their impacts, or use bathymetry and/or 3D seismic data as a model input. Contributions to this session can include work from any depth or physiographic region, e.g. oceanic plateaus, abyssal hills, mid-ocean ridges, accretionary wedges, and continental margins (from abyss plains to continental shelves). Datasets of any scale, from satellite-predicted depth to ultra high-resolution swath bathymetry, sub-surface imaging and sampling are anticipated.

Read less

Conveners:

Peter Van Der Beek (France), Giandomenico Fubelli (Italy), Efthimios Karymbalis (Greece)


Tectonic geomorphology focuses on understanding the mechanisms that drive interactions among Earth surface processes, tectonics and climate in landscape evolution, with implications for the forecasting of future scenarios.

The IAG Tectonic Geomorphology Working Group and the EGU Geomorphology Division co-organize this session to present and promote multi-disciplinary and innovative research aimed at defining the effects of active tectonics on landscapes.

Over the past decades, advances in the quantification of both the physical behavior and the rates of tectonic and surface processes have led to an explosion of new research in the field of Tectonic Geomorphology. Understanding the mechanisms that drive the interactions between Earth’s internal and surface processes, as well as their mutual feedback relationships, is a key topic for a wide scientific community.

Read more

Modern Tectonic Geomorphology is an exceptionally integrative field that utilizes techniques and data derived from multidisciplinary approaches involving geomorphology, seismology, sedimentology, geochronology, structural and engineering geology, climatology and Quaternary geology.

Given the recent development of new tools and methodologies (e.g., quantitative and object-based geomorphology, geodesy, improved chronological techniques, numerical modeling, quantitative stratigraphy), this session aims at presenting and promoting multidisciplinary and innovative studies in Tectonic Geomorphology in various geodynamic contexts.

Contributions focusing on distinctive space and time scales are welcome. Regional- to basin-scale studies deciphering the long-term geomorphological evolution related to mantle and deep crustal activity, as well as basin- to slope-scale research decoding short-term to catastrophic morpho-evolutionary contexts are strongly encouraged. Importance will also be given to advanced and original studies including: the mapping and use of geomorphic markers for tracing deformation; chronological techniques used to date geomorphic markers and events; development of geostatistical and geomorphic tools to detect active tectonic structures; calibration and integration of quantitative methods to estimate uplift, erosion and deposition rates; geodetic techniques for defining recent deformation; landscape evolution modeling; analysis of the effects of morpho-evolutionary rates on large slope instabilities; paleoseismologic approaches to calibrate past deformation.

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Conveners:

Nikolas Zouros (Greece), Paola Coratza (Italy), Emmanuel Reynard (Switzerland)

In collaboration with Global Geoparks Network (GGN)


UNESCO Global Geoparks, the new third site designation of UNESCO, aim to achieve active geoheritage conservation and management and sustainable local development through geotourism.

UNESCO Global Geoparks are single, unified geographical areas where geosites and landscapes of international geological significance are managed with a holistic concept of protection, education and sustainable development. At present, there are 140 UNESCO Global Geoparks in 38 countries. Thus UNESCO Global Geoparks are promoted as sustainable tourism destinations.

Their bottom-up approach involving local communities in geoconservation is becoming increasingly popular, attracting territories hosting geosites and geomorphosites of international importance worldwide to join this initiative and rise their tourism potential.

Read more

During the last years Geoparks had a significant contribution to the rapid expansion of geotourism, in which the main objects are geosites and geomorphosites, based on their scenic and scientific value as well as on the development of innovative experiential activities and interpretive products that reveal and explain their heritage values to their visitors.

Geomorphologists play a key role in the development of the UNESCO Global Geoparks contributing to the assessment, conservation and management of geosites and geomorphosites and rising their visibility as  key factors of tourist attraction.

In this session we want to address these subjects, including current methods of research and debate on geoheritage and geotourism especially in UNESCO Global Geoparks and aspiring geoparks. In particular we invite presentations related to the following themes:

  • Presentations of methods (mapping, assessment, classification);
  • Case studies of geoheritage, geosites and geomorphosites conservation and management;
  • Geoheritage promotion, geotourism development and educational aspects of geosites and geomorphosites.

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Conveners:

Allan James (USA), Dan Balteanu (Romania),Anna Karkani (Greece)


This session concentrates upon anthropogeomorphology; that is, the impacts of human activities on geomorphic systems. These impacts have varied through time from erosion and sedimentation generated by subtle, localized land-use changes in the Neolithic to large features, such as canals and mine pits that were generated relatively rapidly. The geomorphic systems of concern include direct impacts on fluvial, coastal, aeolian, and hillslope areas as well as indirect

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geomorphic impacts on cryogenic (periglacial and glacial), hydrofluvial, and coastal systems effected by climate warming, sea level rise, and associated processes. In this session we welcome contributions that emphasize geomorphic changes caused by humans from a scientific perspective, rather than impacts of geomorphic systems on humans. Although human adjustments to these changes, in the form of policies or adaptive behaviors, are relevant and may be included as important aspects of the geomorphic impacts, in this session we welcome papers focused on the physical nature of the changes at any spatial or temporal scale and the associated processes.

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Conveners:

Francisco Gutiérrez (Espania), Chris Pennos (Greece), Aurel Persoiu (Romania)


Karst landforms are mainly the result of geochemical and hydrogeological processes acting on soluble substratum, either carbonates or evaporites. The resulting landscapes are widespread around the globe, covering around 20%of the ice-free land surface, and including numerous properties of outstanding universal value. Understanding the peculiar geomorphology and hydrology of these environments is essential to

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prevent and mitigate a great deal of environmental and engineering problems associated with them (e.g., sinkholes, water over-exploitation and degradation). Moreover, karst caves contain some of the most valuable paleoenvironmental records of the continental realm. This session aims to bring together researchers working on karst geomorphology and related topics.

Special attention will be given to the following themes: (1) driving agents and scales of karst dissolution; (2) impact of active tectonics on cave architecture; (3) karst deposits and their paleoclimate record; (4) karst in high-solubility evaporite rocks; (5) impact and hazards in karst environments; (6) paleokarst.

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Conveners:

Taylor Perron (USA), William Ouimet (USA), Emmanuel Vassilakis (Greece)


In recent decades, research in geomorphology has increasingly used high resolution topography from sources such as LiDAR (aerial or ground based), Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry (SfM), and even handheld scanning devices. Analysis techniques have expanded to include point cloud processing and change detection by differencing in addition to methods based on high-resolution DEMs. Beyond geomorphology, these datasets offer

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a new perspective in other disciplines through high-resolution geological or landform mapping, measurement of active environmental processes, or monitoring various  natural hazards.

We invite contributions describing research that leverages high-resolution topography and terrain analysis at any scale and in any environment, including field studies, theoretical studies, and 
descriptions of new methodologies, best practices, advantages or limitations in the use of such datasets.

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Conveners:

Christian Gorini (France), Benjamin Medvedef (Israel), Spyros Bellas (Greece)


We now know that both deep-seated as well as surficial geological processes control geomorphological evolution of landscapes and seascapes. Increasingly higher resolution 2D and 3D seismic surveys, in combination with the continuously improving visualization tools, help us better understand the vertical architecture of landforms.

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Although sequence stratigraphic concepts are being applied at increasing higher orders, even at the scale of Milankovitch cyclicity in high-sedimentation rate successions, it is also becoming apparent that regional tectonics (in addition to climate and eustasy) play an important role, i.e., dissimilar tectonic regimes can appreciably modify the resulting depositional architecture and passive margin models often cannot be applied in tectonically active areas.  Geomorphological panoramas gleaned through high-resolution seismics, especially 3D, can now allow us to understand and exploit deep-water depositional environments.

In this session we hope to cover the state of the art of both clastic and carbonate depositional systems in shallow and deep water environments, their differences, and role played by both deep-seated and surficial processes.

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Conveners:

Alessandra Savini (Italy), Aaron Micallef (Malta), Paraskevi Nomikou (Greece)


The shape of the seafloor and sub-seafloor stratigraphic horizons preserve a wealth of information that reflects the time-integrated effects of tectonic, sedimentary, oceanographic and volcanic processes. Many such processes are hazards to coastal populations and offshore installations, and they constitute key objectives of national research programmes and IODP expeditions, notably in climatically and tectonically sensitive regions.

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High quality bathymetry, especially when combined with
sub-seafloor and/or seabed measurements, provides an exciting opportunity
to integrate the approaches of geomorphology and geophysics and to extend
quantitative geomorphology offshore.

This session aims to examine the causes and consequences of geomorphic and
tectonic processes shaping underwater landscapes, including submarine

erosion and depositional processes, submarine landslides, sediment
transfer and deformation, volcanic activity, fluid migration and escape,
faulting and folding.

The general goal of the session is to bring together researchers who
characterise the shape of past and present seafloor features, seek to
understand the sub-surface and surface processes at work and their
impacts, or use bathymetry and/or 3D seismic data as a model input.
Contributions to this session can include work from any depth or
physiographic region, e.g. oceanic plateaus, abyssal hills, mid-ocean
ridges, accretionary wedges, and continental margins (from abyss plains to
continental shelves). Datasets of any scale, from satellite-predicted
depth to ultra high-resolution swath bathymetry, sub-surface imaging and
sampling are anticipated.

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Conveners:

Peter Van Der Beek (France), Giandomenico Fubelli (Italy), Efthimios Karymbalis (Greece)


Tectonic geomorphology focuses on understanding the mechanisms that drive interactions among Earth surface processes, tectonics and climate in landscape evolution, with implications for the forecasting of future scenarios.

The IAG Tectonic Geomorphology Working Group and the EGU Geomorphology Division co-organize this session to present and promote multi-disciplinary and innovative research aimed at defining the effects of active tectonics on landscapes.

Read more

Over the past decades, advances in the quantification of both the physical behavior and the rates of tectonic and surface processes have led to an explosion of new research in the field of Tectonic Geomorphology. Understanding the mechanisms that drive the interactions between Earth’s internal and surface processes, as well as their mutual feedback relationships, is a key topic for a wide scientific community.

Modern Tectonic Geomorphology is an exceptionally integrative field that utilizes techniques and data derived from multidisciplinary approaches involving geomorphology, seismology, sedimentology, geochronology, structural and engineering geology, climatology and Quaternary geology.

Given the recent development of new tools and methodologies (e.g., quantitative and object-based geomorphology, geodesy, improved chronological techniques, numerical modeling, quantitative stratigraphy), this session aims at presenting and promoting multidisciplinary and innovative studies in Tectonic Geomorphology in various geodynamic contexts.

Contributions focusing on distinctive space and time scales are welcome. Regional- to basin-scale studies deciphering the long-term geomorphological evolution related to mantle and deep crustal activity, as well as basin- to slope-scale research decoding short-term to catastrophic morpho-evolutionary contexts are strongly encouraged. Importance will also be given to advanced and original studies including: the mapping and use of geomorphic markers for tracing deformation; chronological techniques used to date geomorphic markers and events; development of geostatistical and geomorphic tools to detect active tectonic structures; calibration and integration of quantitative methods to estimate uplift, erosion and deposition rates; geodetic techniques for defining recent deformation; landscape evolution modeling; analysis of the effects of morpho-evolutionary rates on large slope instabilities; paleoseismologic approaches to calibrate past deformation.

Read less

Conveners:

Nikolas Zouros (Greece), Paola Coratza (Italy), Emmanuel Reynard (Switzerland)

In collaboration with Global Geoparks Network (GGN)


UNESCO Global Geoparks, the new third site designation of UNESCO, aim to achieve active geoheritage conservation and management and sustainable local development through geotourism.

UNESCO Global Geoparks are single, unified geographical areas where geosites and landscapes of international geological significance are managed with a holistic concept of protection,

Read more

education and sustainable development. At present, there are 140 UNESCO Global Geoparks in 38 countries. Thus UNESCO Global Geoparks are promoted as sustainable tourism destinations.

Their bottom-up approach involving local communities in geoconservation is becoming increasingly popular, attracting territories hosting geosites and geomorphosites of international importance worldwide to join this initiative and rise their tourism potential.

During the last years Geoparks had a significant contribution to the rapid expansion of geotourism, in which the main objects are geosites and geomorphosites, based on their scenic and scientific value as well as on the development of innovative experiential activities and interpretive products that reveal and explain their heritage values to their visitors.

Geomorphologists play a key role in the development of the UNESCO Global Geoparks contributing to the assessment, conservation and management of geosites and geomorphosites and rising their visibility as  key factors of tourist attraction.

In this session we want to address these subjects, including current methods of research and debate on geoheritage and geotourism especially in UNESCO Global Geoparks and aspiring geoparks. In particular we invite presentations related to the following themes:

  • Presentations of methods (mapping, assessment, classification);
  • Case studies of geoheritage, geosites and geomorphosites conservation and management;
  • Geoheritage promotion, geotourism development and educational aspects of geosites and geomorphosites.

Read less

Abstract Submission

Participants can present their research work either as oral or poster at RCG2019. The deadline for submitting abstracts is May 15th (extended to May 31st 2019), 2019. The Organizing Committee accepts submission of abstracts with original contributions on any topic related to any technical session. Abstracts will be published in the form submitted by the author after revision (if suggested by the concerned Chairpersons). Acceptance letters will be sent to the Presenting Author by e-mail only.

Authors who wish to submit an abstract for consideration, kindly follow the instructions outlined in Abstract Submission Guidelines of our website. Abstract Submission Fee (Non Refundable) is 10€ and compulsory for each abstract submission.

Abstract Submission Guidelines Abstract Submission

Field Trips

All the field trip destinations are to islands that in September 2019 are normally in high season. Although, there is no limit for the number of participants in the field trips, the participation fee depends on the accommodation cost and availability. The organizing committee strongly recommends an early registration for the field trip participants. Field trip registrations will close with the end of accommodation availability. Prior action for Field Trip Registration is the Conference Registration.

Pre-Conference Field Trips

Santorini Island, Cyclades, Aegean Sea

Duration: 4 Days – 3 Nights

Thira (Santorini) Island is located in the center of the Aegean Sea. The geomorphology of the island is highly related with the presence of an active volcano. The great volcanic eruption in the late Bronze Age (ca.1600 BC) destroyed the Cycladic Civilization and buried the ancient settlement of Akrotiri under 30 meters of volcanic ash. The participants will be introduced on the geomorphological and coastal evolution of the island and visit the Caldera, the active volcano and the archaeological site of Santorini.

Conveners:Vouvalidis Konstantinosvouval@geo.auth.gr
Nomikou Paraskevievinom@geol.uoa.gr
Pavlides Spyridonpavlides@geo.auth.gr

Santorini Island, Cyclades, Aegean Sea

Duration: 4 Days – 3 Nights

Thira (Santorini) Island is located in the center of the Aegean Sea. The geomorphology of the island is highly related with the presence of an active volcano. The great volcanic eruption in the late Bronze Age (ca.1600 BC) destroyed the Cycladic Civilization and buried the ancient settlement of Akrotiri under 30 meters of volcanic ash. The participants will be introduced on the geomorphological and coastal evolution of the island and visit the Caldera, the active volcano and the archaeological site of Santorini.

Conveners:Vouvalidis Konstantinosvouval@geo.auth.gr
Nomikou Paraskevievinom@geol.uoa.gr
Pavlides Spyridonpavlides@geo.auth.gr

Post-Conference Field Trip

Duration: 4 Days – 3 Nights

Rhodes Island is located in the southeast part of the Aegean Sea. The Island is rich in geomorphological sea level indicators, mainly in the form of uplifted tidal notches, which reveal that Rhodes is composed of small crustal blocks with each block being affected by a particular tectonic history. The participants will be introduced on the coastal geomorphological coastal evolution of the island, controlled by tectonics, and its paleo-seismicity history.

Conveners:Evelpidou Nikievelpidou@geol.uoa.gr
Kapsimalis Vasilioskapsim@hcmr.gr
Sakellariou Dimitrissakell@hcmr.gr
Karkani Annaekarkani@geol.uoa.gr

Duration: 4 Days – 3 Nights

Rhodes Island is located in the southeast part of the Aegean Sea. The Island is rich in geomorphological sea level indicators, mainly in the form of uplifted tidal notches, which reveal that Rhodes is composed of small crustal blocks with each block being affected by a particular tectonic history. The participants will be introduced on the coastal geomorphological coastal evolution of the island, controlled by tectonics, and its paleo-seismicity history.

Conveners:Evelpidou Nikievelpidou@geol.uoa.gr
Kapsimalis Vasilioskapsim@hcmr.gr
Sakellariou Dimitrissakell@hcmr.gr
Karkani Annaekarkani@geol.uoa.gr

2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course

Field Training School on “Coastal Geomorphology of Climatically and Τectonically sensitive areas”

Maximum number of participants: 18 Young Geomorphologists.

As part of the Conference programme, the 2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course for Young Geomorphologists will be organized during 22-27 September 2019 at the Harokopio University of Athens and the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research faculties (Anavyssos, Attica). The event will be part of the IAG Training Programme and will be for the second time organized in collaboration with the EGU Geomorphology Division, based on a Memorandum of Understanding recently signed between the aforementioned and the IAG.

The 2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course for Young Geomorphologists will be an extraordinary occasion, especially for those from less-favoured countries, to learn pioneering techniques, innovative and multidisciplinary approaches to be used in geomorphological field work in Climatically and Tectonically sensitive coastal areas.

The 2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course for Young Geomorphologists will take place as Field Training School along the south coast of the Gulf of Corinth, Perachora peninsula and in the Bay of Psatha (east Gulf of Corinth). The Gulf of Corinth is one of the world’s most active and studied rift basins.

Young Geomorphologists who are willing to take part in the 2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course for Young Geomorphologists should have a special interest and research experience in the topics of the field training school, to be proved by their CV. Candidates are asked to submit the following documents before 1st May 2019 using the website application form:
– Application form (visit the conference website)
– Copy of valid passport or identity card
– Short CV (maximum 2 pages long), including up to 10 papers related to the Intensive Course topics.
The selection of candidates will be carried out by a Commission appointed by the Program Committee of the 2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course.

REGISTRATION FORM

For the participation to the

2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course: Field Training School on
“Coastal Geomorphology of
Climatically and Τectonically sensitive areas”

Regional Conference on Geomorphology – RCG2019

Athens, Greece, 22 – 27 September 2019

Registration
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IAG GRANTS for the IAG Regional Conference on Geomorphology

The International Association of Geomorphologists (IAG) offers a number of grants for YOUNG GEOMORPHOLOGISTS (under 35 yrs old) who are willing to take part in the IAG Regional Conference on Geomorphology to be held in Athens (Greece) from 19-21 September 2019. The grants are offered to Young Geomorphologists from less-favored countries worldwide (with a Purchasing Power Parity below 22,000 international dollars, according to the World Development Indicators database, World Bank, revised 21 September 2018).

In addition to the funds allocated by the IAG to support Young Geomorphologists, the European Geosciences Union (EGU) allocated a budget to co-sponsor the 2nd IAGEGU Intensive Course for Young Geomorphologists. The amount of single grants will depend on the country of origin (or place of residence) and on estimated financial needs of the grant winners. The grants are intended to cover (at least partially) travel costs to and from Athens, accommodation during the Conference and fee of the Intensive Course. In addition, the Organizing Committee will waive the Conference registration fee. The participation in the Intensive Course is highly recommended and the intention to participate in the Course will be considered as a preferential title in the selection of the applicants. Applicants should have a special interest and research experience in the themes of both the Conference and the Intensive Course, to be proved by their CV.

For details on the call for grants see (http://www.geomorph.org/category/yg/grants/open-calls/)

Training School Speakers

David Fernández-Blanco

Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris

Julius Jara-Muñoz

Institute of Geosciences, University of Potsdam

Stefano Furlani

Department of Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste

Dimitris Papanastassiou

Institute of Geodynamics, National Observatory of Athens

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION

  • Authors must pay the abstract fee at the time of submission of their abstract(s). Abstract submission will be INCOMPLETE without the payment of abstract fee.
  • Abstract fee once paid is NOT Refundable.

STUDENT REGISTRATION

Student Registration Fee is applied to the persons below 35 years of age and continuing their M.Sc./M.Phil./Ph. D. as a Full –time student/scholar. A copy of an ID document is required (Institutional ID card or a letter from the Departmental Head or Research Supervisor) to avail the student’s registration facility. Non-compliant delegates will be charged the applicable full registration rate.

ACCOMPANYING PERSON’S REGISTRATION INCLUDES

The accompanying person(s) rate is intended for spouses or other relatives of participants registered in any of the other categories. Accompanying person registered in this category cannot present papers or posters, however, they are allowed to attend conference sessions/meetings.

MODE OF PAYMENT OF REGISTRATION FEE

Registration Fee can be paid online through conference website.

REGISTRATION CANCELLATION & REFUND POLICY

In case of cancellation of registration, following terms & conditions for refund will apply:

  • Cancellation request must be received by the conference secretariat through email at secretariat@rcg2019.com
  • Refund, if any will be done post conference within 20 days of conclusion of RCG 2019.
  • 50% refund for cancellation request received on or before 31st July, 2019.
  • NO REFUND for cancellations received after 31st July, 2019.
  • NO REFUND for the fee paid for abstract submission.

Conference fees

All participants can apply for a discount on the conference fee, whenever their country (National Scientific Member) is financially-settled with the IAG’s annual fee.
Countries with current Discount status are: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Malta, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, United Kingdom, USA.

Your country will be verified both by your IP address and ID information

Regular

Discount

Early Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€300

Regular Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€350

Late Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€400

Students, Honorary Fellows, Retired, National delegates

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€180

Accompanied Person

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€100

Social Dinner

Click here to Register

€55

Abstract Fee

*compulsory for each abstract submission

Click here to Register

€10

Field Training School

*2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course

Click here to Register

€300

Early Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€250

Regular Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€300

Late Registration

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€350

Students, Honorary Fellows, Retired, National delegates

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€180

Accompanied Person

* The fee includes coffee, finger food lunch, and visit to the Acropolis Museum.* The social dinner is not included in Conference Fee.

Click here to Register

€100

Social Dinner

Click here to Register

€55

Abstract Fee

*compulsory for each abstract submission

Click here to Register

€10

Field Training School

*2nd IAG-EGU Intensive Course

Click here to Register

€300

Accommodation

The accommodation during the conference proceedings will be held at hotels near the conference Venue. The availability and the prices will be available for the delegates on the registration form of our conference website. For further information, please contact the Conference PCO, Artion at info@rcg2019.com .

Grande Bretagne

Location: Syntagma

Category: 5 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 1km

Athens Plaza Hotel

Location: Syntagma

Category: 5 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 1km

King George

Location: Syntagma

Category: 5 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 1km

Electra

Location: Syntagma

Category: 5 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 1km

The Zillers

Location: Monastiraki

Category: 4 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 2km

Athens Way

Location: Neapoli

Category:  3 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 1km

The Hilton

Location: Evaggelismos

Category: 5 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 3km

Wyndham Grand Athens

Location: Metaxourgeio

Category: 5 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 3km

Melia

Location: Omonia

Category: 4 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 2km

Grecotel Pallas Athena

Location: Kotzia Square

Category:  5 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 2km

Polis Grand Hotel

Location: Metaxourgeio

Category: 4 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 3km

Bohemian Suites

Location: Kolonaki

Category: 3 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 1km

The Stanley

Location: Metaxourgeio

Category: 4 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 3km

Coco- Mat

Location: Kolonaki

Category:  4 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 2km

Perianth

Location: Syntagma

Category: 5 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 2km

360 Degrees

Location: Monastiraki

Category: 3 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 2km

Amalia

Location: Syntagma

Category: 4 – Stars

Distance from Venue : 2km

Organizers

The Greek Committee for Geomorphology & Environment of the Geological Society of Greece, IAG/AIG national member for Greece.

Co-Organizers

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Conference Locations